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ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

'Peanutize Me' Latest in Personalized Movie-Marketing Apps

Ready-to-personalize memes on social media have proved a powerful marketing tool for the entertainment industry, with options to pose with Yoda in your profile picture, or remix the "Straight Outta Compton" imagery with your own location. The "Peanuts" movie is the latest in a string of films that offer a way for moviegoers to show off enthusiasm without experiencing (or sharing) a "hard-sell feeling." Click here to read more.

Feds: House Bill Could Make Cars More Vulnerable to Hackers

Internet-connected smart cars have made consumers and lawmakers nervous as reports of hacking prompted recalls and greater advocacy. A new bill, which aims to improve vehicle security, seems to provide privacy policies to vehicle owners, but regulators say the bill will backfire by overriding existing consumer protections. The large fines could also deter researchers from further testing of cars' security. Click here to read more.

Target's New Website Helps Trick-or-Treaters Find Best Candy Haunts in the Neighborhood

Just in time for Halloween, Target launches a mobile and desktop app, Treatster, that allows trick-or-treaters to up-vote homes giving out good candy, and therefore for fellow users to search out the popular locations. The more votes a place gets, the bigger the Target-branded jack-o'-lantern gets. Click here to read more.

T&Cs Change Tracker Puts Shifting Small-Print In The Spotlight

While consumers maintain concern over security, it's nearly impossible to keep up with lengthy terms and conditions notices, an issue solved with a new tracker. Watching T&Cs evolve with highlighted changes allows consumers to stay abreast of disclosures and privacy changes. Click here to read more.

Why Does Facebook Keep Suggesting You Friend Your Tinder Matches?

Keen social media users who use differing networks to find friends and dates have spotted an overlap of algorithms wherein previously unconnected potential dates appear as people you should know on other networks. The suggestions appear even if the people hadn't yet gone on a date, leading some to wonder how much the disparate apps are sharing your information, whether it's based on opt-ins, or simply smart searches. Click here to read more.






Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Personalized Tech in “Back to the Future Part II”

Image Source
In 1989 Robert Zemeckis let us have a little peek at 2015 with Back to the Future Part II, the second film in the classic Marty McFly and Doc Brown time-travel trilogy. Well here we are in 2015, and despite many promises of self-lacing shoes and hoverboards, neither has truly come to fruition. What they did get right though, was a lot of intuitive, personalized technology.

Remember how biometrics were used for payment and identity in everyday situations? Tranquilized Jennifer is taken home when the police are able to identify her by thumbprint, Doc pays for a cab by pressing his finger to a tablet and Marty signs a petition for the clock tower in the same way. Keys, wallet and signatures disappeared in the movie's version of 2015 because each thumb-press interaction is an opt-in that provides only the information the service needs and doesn't unnecessarily divulge the person's other secure information. In a way, that reflects much of what modern consumers have come to expect - touchpoints that collect and use particular data while maintaining the ability to provide omnichannel experiences.

Without preference management - the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication - characters in Zemeckis' version of 2015 couldn't have had safe and seamless experiences in their smart homes, making purchases, or otherwise sharing personal information.

In our real-life version of 2015, we know that today's consumers expect personalized experiences, but they are more apt to opt-in when they're aware of how their information is being used. This means that brands are able to give consumers control of the conversation while enhancing their experiences with personalization. Moreover, preference management has the ability to separate your brands from others by providing a comparison point to companies that haven't undertaken preference management initiatives and therefore can't create personalized experiences while maintaining compliance.

In the movie's version of 2015, the characters expect that their technology will recognize them, anticipate their needs and keep their data safe. Can you say that about your consumers' experiences with your brand? Preference management will get you there - flux capacitor not required.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Implementation of Preference Management: Tracking Results and Proving ROI

Preference Management Video Series

A limited scope of engagement for an initial preference management project allows enterprises to build a simple, gradual case for additional investment. By streamlining metrics, something as simple as an opt-down, instead of an opt-out, can prove immense value in a mere 90 days. A powerful business case is within reach if you follow a few actionable steps in order to track and demonstrate ROI.

First, have a clearly outlined initial implementation – that means a limited scope and a clear benchmark, even as simple as converting opt-outs to opt-ins. Next, you'll want to work from a reasonable timetable in order to manage expectations while allowing time to demonstrate value. Third, come to the table with the proper assessment – a detailed "before" picture will help you work from the current state of affairs. Once the program is in place, check in frequently for progress or course-corrections – often you'll be working with internal departments who wouldn't otherwise communicate with each other. Next, translate preference collection to bottom-line value by assessing opportunity costs of opt-outs and therefore the value for a targeted opt-in. Finally, use these assessments to explain the bigger picture in order to champion the efforts and successes of preference management.

By the time you've run a first preference management project by properly preparing, managing a gradual growth as well as centralizing data, proving ROI should be easier. Enterprises ready for greater preference management expansions will be on the right track to listen and learn from consumers.





In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the implementation of preference management. If you haven't yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Implementation of Preference Management whitepaper here.




Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Assuming Your Numbers Make Sense

After seeing devastating flood damage in South Carolina, newscasters began repeating the phrase "thousand-year-storm" to describe what had happened. But many mistakenly interpreted the phrase to mean that the storm was likely to happen once every thousand years.

In actuality, the "thousand" is in reference to the likelihood of it happening in any year. You could actually experience a thousand-year-storm multiple times in a year. But don't let that stop armchair statisticians from describing it as something the area might have been "due" for. That hinges on the very human belief that events are somehow supposed to make sense rather than be completely random. In reality, a sodden neighborhood's chances of a three-day downpour is exactly the same, every year, forever.

In much the same way, marketers believe that vast data collection somehow leads to coherent data organization. We're collecting more and more of it every day, through every channel. And many of us believe that all that data will somehow add up to reveal a consistent identity - a unified picture of a consumer that aids personalization and customer experience.

But a global report conducted by Signal indicates that just six percent of marketers have figured out cross-channel identity. That means data fragmentation is an overwhelming challenge for a vast majority of marketers, putting them in the position of constantly playing catch-up while they juggle bits of a picture that don't make sense.

Obstacles like data collection and fragmentation mean that marketing measurement and personalization are out of reach-crucially important elements that could be solved with preference management. Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication, is an essential tool in creating seamless user experiences, customer engagement and, most importantly, a whole picture where there were once just pieces. Having a lot of data is one thing, knowing how to connect it is another.

And the upside to this slow race? Anyone already confronting these issues is ahead in the game. Knowing that such a minuscule amount of marketers have the capabilities of cross-channel identity means that those who can figure it out now will stay in the lead and continue to offer consumers what they want.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

YouTube Introduces Shopping Ads

YouTube's new ad unit, called Shopping ads, will allow advertisers to sell their products through the site's videos. Consumers can purchase directly from a video that features the item-and product videos (like reviews and tutorials) have seen 40 percent viewership growth this year. Click here to read more.

How Campbell's Is Offering Recipes via Amazon's Voice-Control System

Amazon's Echo, an in-home speaker with voice-control technology, offers branded content to users from companies like Campbell's. The speaker's voice app, Alexa, can either email or read out recipes when prompted by hungry users. Click here to read more.

China welcomes Apple's iPhones. Its News app? Not so much.

As Apple's sales grow in China, its had to navigate the country's policies on censoring controversial content, meaning that services like Apple News or Apple Music would be affected. Within China, the only users able to access News are visitors from outside the country, but even then, the app will not refresh. Click here to read more.

Moments, the best of Twitter in an instant

Social media users can catch up on the world around them, thanks to Twitter's new Moments feature. Tweets, images, videos, Vines and GIFs are sorted by timely subject, whether a conversation, meme, commentary or historic report. Users can view a moment, or follow it if it's ongoing, personalizing the media experience. Click here to read more.

E*Trade, Dow Jones Issue Breach Alerts

Pointing to a massive financial services breach in 2013, E*Trade and Dow Jones are issuing alerts to thousands of customers that their data may have been accessed in the hack. While at the time, the companies believed sensitive data like account numbers, passwords, IDs or Social Security numbers weren't accessed, they are now finding that some information was leaked. Click here to read more.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

L'Oréal USA's CMO Answers 4 Questions For Marketing Innovators

Marie Gulin-Merle has more than 15 years of experience in managing communications and digital strategies for fast-moving consumer goods and beauty luxury brands.


Before she was appointed CMO of L'Oréal USA nearly a year-and-a-half ago, Gulin-Merle served as global head of integrated marketing communications for L'Oréal Paris.

Gulin-Merle is credited with successfully reinventing integrated communications for L'Oréal Paris. Through her strategic leadership in the digital space, she also overhauled the content strategy for the brand's product innovations and modernized major events, such as L'Oréal Paris' involvement in the Cannes Film Festival.

Gulin-Merle recently participated in our "4 Questions for Marketing Innovators" series.

  1. What is one marketing topic that is most important to you as an innovator?
    The shift to data-driven marketing in the consumer packaged goods world is changing the way we do business. [Tweet this] At L'Oreal USA, we're leveraging this to cultivate more intimate relationships with our customers, who expect more value, more services, more engagements, and more conversations with our beauty brands.
  2. Why is this so important?
    Data-driven marketing unlocks immense possibilities of personalized brand experiences and puts the consumer at the center of each and every marketing decision. It has the power to change the way we develop products, campaigns, and our go-to-market strategy.

    The development of mobile is crucial for customization; the content has to be even sharper and continuously adapted and adjusted. One survey found that nearly two-thirds (62%) of Millennials feel that online content drives their brand loyalty. We're constantly using consumer insights to connect with them in innovative ways on mobile to build brand loyalty and trust so they feel satisfied with their shopping decisions.

    Our Makeup Genius app is a great example of how to connect with consumers through innovation. The app transforms the front-facing camera of your phone into a virtual mirror where users can try on products virtually. The app uses advanced facial-mapping technology that has previously only been used in Hollywood and in the gaming industry to overlay products, like lipstick and eyeliner, onto the user's face.
  3. How will the customer experience be improved by this?
    This new area creates value for consumers through more effective engagement. Consumers' digital expectations toward our brands have changed with the influx of data-driven marketing, and we're responding by using consumer data to help personalize our message, optimize investments, and engage with our customers at each and every step of their shopping journey.

    We want our consumers to continuously engage with products and be given an easy, seamless way to merge online and offline experiences. Customers expect L'Oreal USA brands to understand their needs. We're providing more customized, dynamic content to do just that.
  4. How will this improve the effectiveness of marketing?
    Technology-driven marketing means that any contact with our consumer will provide data, and that data will make the brand experience richer and tailored to each individual customer. This also translates to efficiencies to better measure our media return on investments, as well as better consumer engagement and loyalty.


    Bonus: Favorite activity outside of work?
    I'm a voracious reader. I love books about political history, revolutions, and French novels of the 19th century. Can't pass up a good autobiography either!




About the Author:
Ernan Roman Direct Marketing's Customer Experience strategies achieve consistent double-digit increases in response and revenue for their clients, which include IBM, MassMutual, QVC, Microsoft, and Symantec Corp.

As a leader in providing Voice of Customer research-based guidance, ERDM has conducted over 10,000 hours of interviews with their clients' customers and prospects, to gain an in-depth understanding of their expectations for high-value relationships.

The results achieved by ERDM's VoC-based strategies earned Ernan Roman induction into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

Visit his blog at: http://ernanroman.blogspot.com/

Preparing for Fall’s Windfall

Feel that chill in the air? That’s the signal of big things on the horizon and I don't just mean the pumpkin spice hype. For marketers, it's the start of the holiday shopping season. Thirty-two million shoppers are already be on the prowl for gifts, yet two percent of all American shoppers say they already finished their lists, according to a recent survey.

Aside from the earlybirds, the remaining ninety-eight percent of shoppers will be hitting the stores soon - all the way up to Christmas Day, for some latecomers. Since the majority of shopping takes place in the month of December, right now marks the point at which you should be double-checking that your customer-facing systems are presenting a cohesive message to consumers. Avoiding unnecessary frustrations across touchpoints ensures they have a unified experience across platforms. Over time, your trustworthiness and familiarity proves that consumers can return to your brand for many of their holiday needs.

But even more important than the immediate to-do is following up on any advances you've put into place to capture consumer preferences. Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication, is the best way to encourage customers to engage with you on their terms. By acting on data provided by customers themselves throughout the year, you're able to shape and build relationships over time. Which means that come holiday shopping season, even that two percent of earlybirds will have made their purchases thanks to guidance and communications from you that reflect their stated needs.

In the same survey, 60 percent of shoppers said their main method of holiday shopping would be in retail stores. Thirty percent said that they would be mainly shopping online using computers or mobile devices. Altogether that contingent – 90 percent of shoppers - represents a massive opportunity to coordinate across touchpoints for preferences. Then, using preference management, you're able to parse out how customers want to be alerted about specials that are relevant to their shopping lists, whether they want to order online and pick up in your store, or if they’d like recommendations based on previous purchases. And that’s just the beginning. By offering personalization, time-saving opportunities or anticipatory answers to questions, you can be the big win in a hectic season that ends all too quickly.

Ninety-eight percent of customers are waiting for you. Have you spent the year earning your spot on their must-shop list?





About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

Implementation of Preference Management: Centralizing Data

Preference Management Video Series

After unrolling preference management at multiple touchpoints, you will be collecting consumer information at a variety of places that can speak to customers' preferences at different interaction levels. Gathering this information allows you to begin to map the scope of the customer journey. But to best assess this data, you should be centralizing it. Creating a repository not subject to silos means that information can be accessed across the enterprise and ensures that you can create a single view of the customer - streamlining their experience and eliminating contradictions and frustrations.

In this video, Eric Holtzclaw discusses the benefits of centralized data, which can also enhance compliance efforts by maintaining a complete record and facilitating quick responses to inquiries and complaints. Eric also shares one of our client stories that illustrates the way that a lack of precaution can complicate customer data: A leading satellite radio service discovered that customer preferences were being captured and stored in disconnected systems that ranged from their website and contact center to spreadsheets and marketing lists. Fortunately the company was able to undertake an intensive assessment to determine what data was actionable while we were able to step in and act as their central repository. While a lack of data management created a complicated problem, the power of preference management gave us the solutions to set forth on a clear and compliant path.





In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the implementation of preference management. If you haven't yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Implementation of Preference Management whitepaper here.




Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Marketers Must Understand The New Mobile Mind-Set Of Immediacy

In the spring, Google rolled out algorithm changes to devalue "non-mobile-friendly" websites in its search rankings. This has added additional fuel to the ongoing mobile marketing conversation.

However, your website is only one component in your total ability to connect with consumers, who have an entirely different mind-set in their personal mobile world. Another phenomenon rules mobile marketing: the concept of immediacy.
[Tweet this]

According to Forrester:

Two brands that have applied immediacy to their mobile marketing are Budweiser and Krispy Kreme. Read on for what they’ve been doing right.

How Budweiser Gave Buds Instant Access

Budweiser wanted a way to create a user experience that transcended the journey from social ads and posts to mobile video, sharing, location-based guidance, and point-of-sale experience. And it wanted to do all of that in in a way that gave consumers immediate excitement.

The brand came up with its Buds for Buds campaign, which enabled consumers to gift a beer directly from budweiser.com and send it to a friend via Facebook, to be redeemed for immediate or future redemption at a list of local bars identified right on their phones.

Consumers were activated via targeted Facebook ads and guided to a mobile site that authenticated both the purchaser's and recipient's ages. They could then share their "Bud moments" on their timelines.

As for results, the program achieved a 3x in-bar sales lift - meaning people spent three times the value of the beer when redeeming at the bar/POS. Redemptions were 100% of participating bars (thereby increasing on-premise spend and traffic during the program), and purchase conversion rate was 7x industry average. Additionally the program received global media coverage. A larger campaign is planned for the future.

Krispy Kreme Lets Consumers Know When To Come ‘N Get ‘Em Hot

Most people would agree that donuts are better when they are hot out of the oven. This is especially true for Kripy Kreme, which has trained its legion of devoted fans to look for the red light indicating a fresh batch is waiting.

To take advantage of the reach and immediacy of mobile, the company launched its "Red Light App," which lets users map the nearest Krispy Kreme location from their phones and receive an alert when a "Hot Now" light is activated in their area. The signs have a sensor that transmits a signal directly to a software server when illuminated. Once happy donut eaters have satisfied their cravings, they are encouraged to use the hashtag #KrispyKremeMoment to post the hot word to others.

According to Forrester, which used the app as a case study, without spending a penny on marketing, Krispy Kreme saw a 6.8% increase in same-store sales since the app hit the market. In its most recent financial call, the company disclosed systemwide domestic same-store sales rose 5.2% and revenues increased 9%.

TakeAways

What can marketers learn from these examples?

  1. All marketers know they need a mobile component to their overall plan. However, mobile and its nuances need to be considered a lifestyle connection rather than merely as another form of media.
  2. How consumers incorporate their phones and tablets into their lives requires marketers to develop a new mind-set of delivering a satisfying experience with an aspect of immediacy.
  3. Mobile marketing is more than a one-dimensional SMS text message. It needs to be incorporated into every aspect of touch points and interaction, from Web to bricks and mortar.

Your consumers' personal mobile worlds are a direct extension of their lives. Therefore, a successful mobile strategy needs to find the missing links to fulfill needs, offer solutions, and deliver value. With mobile being a prime access point to sales, it is innovation and, most of all, relevancy that ultimately determine your success on this ever-growing platform.



About the Author:
Ernan Roman Direct Marketing's Customer Experience strategies achieve consistent double-digit increases in response and revenue for their clients, which include IBM, MassMutual, QVC, Microsoft, and Symantec Corp.

As a leader in providing Voice of Customer research-based guidance, ERDM has conducted over 10,000 hours of interviews with their clients' customers and prospects, to gain an in-depth understanding of their expectations for high-value relationships.

The results achieved by ERDM's VoC-based strategies earned Ernan Roman induction into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

Visit his blog at: http://ernanroman.blogspot.com/

Better Than Home, Thanks to Personalization

Are you already making holiday travel plans? Me too. Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year and maybe a spring fling to somewhere warm to help forget about all that necessary travel in the first place.

Unfortunately at the end of all those flights or long drives awaits a hotel stay. At times it's a refuge from the stress of a too-long trip or overly complicated airport hijinks, but frankly, hotels are boring. Hotels aren't home, they're anonymous boxes with a lot of beds, aren't they?

Well an earlier report has me hoping for better this time around. When CBS' Peter Greenberg visited Starwood's tech labs, he found out how technology is elevating hospitality with personalization for each customer based on their preferences. The expected technology advances are there, like mobile check-in and keyless entry with apps or Apple Watches, but more granular and personalized details like lighting and temperature can also be adjusted for each guest's preferences. Imagine setting up a morning routine geared toward your own preferences: gradually brightening your lights while the coffeemaker starts up at 6 on the dot.

As hotel brands begin to embrace the power of personalized technology, their nature as a temporary yet recurring host creates vast opportunities to match preferences at across properties for the same guest. Can your hotel access your customer profile before you're even on-site and prep your room? That morning routine of coffee with a side of NPR on the in-room audio is entirely possible, but so is preparing a firm pillow at night and synchronizing an updated weather summary for the following day. Your time-zone-hopping trips could accommodate for jet lag or pre-emptively tell housekeeping you need an extra blanket.

Because brands that use stated preferences to provide offline experiences can replicate those preferences at different touchpoints - or properties - they represent an important element in the personalization of our technology and communications.

Preference management-the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication-will lay the groundwork for the hospitality industry's innovative execution of personalized technology. Yet the example of hotels' preference management also represents the ways in which consumers can expect personalization to perform: across channels, properties, and trips-as well as being based on their own preferences and mutable at any time.

I have high hopes for high thread counts now. Let the reservations begin.






About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

Fitbit guns for the workplace as it achieves HIPAA compliance

Fitbit's recently earned HIPAA certification clears the way for the wearable device to gain traction in corporate wellness programs. Secured health information includes names, birthdates, contact information and device identifiers are protected data. The company announced that it was adding Target's 335,000 employees to its client list, providing its $59 tracker for free to the retailers employees. Click here to read more.

Starbucks Mobile Order & Pay Now Available to Customers Nationwide

Following an initial launch in select U.S. cities, Starbucks recently announced a new feature on their app that allows customers to order and pay ahead for drinks. The app triangulates the customer's location and allows them to choose the nearest store on a map, prompting them for a drink or food order and providing a timeframe of when the order will be ready. Click here to read more.

Macy's Unveils New 'Millennials' Shopping Floor

Macy's flagship location in New York City will feature a new shopping area for millennials, dubbed "one below." The basement-level area will feature specific brands at accessible price points and will feature technology integration like outlets in seating, a selfie camera that posts to social networks, and an interactive Instagram wall that will show rotating images of what other shoppers are buying. Click here to read more.

Google Unveils New Devices to Connect Smartphone and TV

Google's streaming service, Chromecast, announced new streaming devices-one for televisions, another for speakers. The service is intended to link smartphones to TVs and speakers, allowing consumers extended use of apps on other platforms. The devices are compatible with thousands of apps and the company has so far sold 20 million. Click here to read more.

Spotify's Discover Weekly playlist has a bug, and users aren't happy


The popular curated-by-algorithm playlists that Spotify members see each Monday morning didn't show up the other week, leaving many unhappy who'd become accustomed to the service. The exclusive playlists personalize audio experiences and position the company to compete with rival Apple Music in the streaming music landscape. Click here to read more.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

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