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3 Tips to Improve Your Email Marketing Effectiveness

Here are two email stats which reinforce the role of high value email as part of your mix; people who buy products via email spend 138% more than those who didn't receive email offers, and 44% of email recipients made at least one purchase last year based on a promotional email.
Based on this good news, here are 3 strategies for improving the performance of your email;
1. Use Consumer Behaviors to Personalize Email
According to Listrack, "If significant attention is given to email content development, companies can begin to see better results":

  • 90% of online shoppers find it helpful to be alerted when frequently purchased items go on sale.
  • 72% are willing to receive more emails if they feature weekly sales, top sellers and new products.
  • 84% of online consumers who signed up to receive promotional emails want emails to contain products relevant to their purchasing history.
  • 69% are willing to share personal preference data in order to receive emails more relevant to them.
This is in line with ERDM VoC research findings contained in our ebook "5 Ways to Use Human Data to Drive Deep Engagement", in which we noted that:

  • Truly personalized communications motivate customers to provide increasingly deeper levels of information and increases their willingness to engage in interactions.
  • If a consumer feels as though a company is making no effort to understand them, or is only using their information to sell them something, they perceive their marketing as being "value-less" and not worthy of their time.
2. Increase Open Rates with Compelling Subject Lines
A recent analysis of five million emails by the email management service Baydin found that a typical email user gets 147 messages a day and deletes 71 of them (48%). So, finding ways to grab attention is essential.
Marketing company Influitive used creative email subject line to develop an emotional tie to a new product launch for a B-to-B campaign that took big risks and netted big rewards. The company decided to take the risk of an attention grabbing subject line because it fit in with the analogy they were making about building relationships. According to Jim Williams, Vice President of Marketing, "If you can relate some arcane B2B pitch to some personal thing,…then I think you've done a good job as a marketer." The quirky campaign, used the subject line "So I'll pick you up at 7?" And, had a headline stating, "Don't make referrals awkward." It then discussed Influitive's recently launched referral automation solution product.
The company received 10 times the number of normal replies. Results of this email campaign include: 25% open rate (Influitive's highest) and 2.3% click through rate.
3. Use Email To Engage With Relevancy
According to the DMA's National Client Email Survey 2014, a 760 percent increase in email revenue came from segmented emails. The trend is now for marketers to move away from generic messaging and meet consumer demands for relevancy by engaging in more targeted and personalized communications.
Jewlery company Alex & Ani engages with customers throughout their journey, from email to onsite, from social to in-store, and beyond. Through the use of abandoned cart emails the company saw a 73% lift in monthly email revenue and 36% lift in monthly revenue. They sent an initial email message and then followed up a few days later with another email, starting to integrate recommended products based on the customer's known interests or products that other customers recently purchased. The company serves messaging to individual consumers based on increased degrees of interest on specific products, leading to increased conversion rates.
Recommendations for Enhancing Email Value
  • Develop highly targeted, engaging and relevant messaging that presents recipients with a reason to open and act.
  • Use time sensitive offers. They create urgency to act.
  • Integrate your email with other media touch points and events.
  • Develop email messaging around consumer history, preferences, and purchases. When recipients get emails that truly "speak to them" engagement soars.

Consumers — both BtoC and BtoB — are email weary and wary. To drive engagement, emails must contain value and relevance. Use purchase, behavior and interaction data to craft email messaging that is welcomed.




About the Author:
Ernan Roman Direct Marketing's Customer Experience strategies achieve consistent double-digit increases in response and revenue for their clients, which include IBM, MassMutual, QVC, Microsoft, and Symantec Corp.

As a leader in providing Voice of Customer research-based guidance, ERDM has conducted over 10,000 hours of interviews with their clients' customers and prospects, to gain an in-depth understanding of their expectations for high-value relationships.

The results achieved by ERDM's VoC-based strategies earned Ernan Roman induction into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

Visit his blog at: http://ernanroman.blogspot.com/

Why No CCO?

While most of the marketing world is still fixated on the blurry lines that separate a CMO and CTO, a new role is emerging that may offer some clarification. Enter the Chief Customer Officer, the primary advocate for the end user and mediator on their behalf within the company.



According to a recent study by the CCO Council, "the chief customer officer is becoming a staple of modern business" and found that 22 percent of Fortune 200 companies have already adopted the role.



By its very existence, the CCO role demonstrates a significant change in the relationship between many companies and their customers.



First, it suggests companies know much more about their customers than ever before. Customer engagement programs, fueled by preference management, have collected vast amounts of information that help companies tailor experiences and personalize the customer journey.



Second, companies respect the rights and opinions of their customers. The very idea that customer would merit representation - in this case, a literal seat at the table - in company decision-making shows just how far some companies have gone to share ownership of the relationship.



If your company isn't ready for a CCO, think about the reasons why.



Not enough customer data to justify the position?



Not willing to share control of the relationship?



The arguments against a CCO may in fact reveal some shortcomings in your own engagement strategy.



Rob Tate bio
As Vice President of Sales, Rob is responsible for growing the client base and market share and helping his sales team achieve their goals. He also develops partnership opportunities and industry relationships. Rob focuses on generating consistent results, utilizing sales and opportunity management tools and implementing best-of-class sales methodologies all of which have enabled him to build a scalable sales organization. He continually studies how metrics, leadership, culture, and innovation drive business value in the SaaS and marketing automation fields.

ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

Gilt Q&A: Where Fashion Meets the Ultimate Customer Experience

Online retailer Gilt sells high-end fashion brands at a discount but engages customers with exclusive access to flash sales to foster excitement. Welington Fonseca, Vice President of Marketing and Analytics at Gilt, says that personalization is a priority for customers-they send over 2,500 versions of their daily sales reminder email, adjusting versions for self-reported preferences. Click here to read more.


Chevy's Helping Parents Spy on Their Terrible Teen Drivers

Nervous parents with newly minted teen drivers will be able to set their Chevy automobiles to "Teen Driver" modes that will prevent certain actions and report back on others. The feature, associated with a specific key fob, won't let drivers disable safety features and also create data on distance driven, maximum speed traveled, how many speed warnings were issued, or if there were any antilock or stability control events. Click here to read more.


First CASL Fine Issued for $1.1 Million Due to Non-Compliance

Eight months after the Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation was passed, the first fine was levied against Compu-Finder for non-compliance. The law is one of the strictest yet, requiring opt-ins for communications involving commercial activity, and Compu-Finder was hit with four violations, including non-functional unsubscribe mechanisms and accounting for 26% of all complaints submitted about the particular sector. Click here to read more.


Minimalist privacy wallet company fires up Kickstarter campaign

Startup company Clover Wallet Co. neared their halfway point of Kickstarter fundraising within a week of launching their aluminum-frame wallet. The minimalist frame holds eight keys, credits cards and cash, but the aluminum keeps data safe with radio-frequency identification protection. Click here to read more.


Elon Musk Says Self-Driving Tesla Cars Will Be in the U.S. by Summer

A software update this summer will make Tesla auto models self-driving, says Elon Musk, Chief Executive of Tesla. The hands-free mode will allow drivers to operate on "autopilot" on major roads like highways. The update would also allow the cars to be "summoned by the driver via smartphone and can park themselves in a garage or elsewhere." Click here to read more.





Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

PossibleNOW Participates at Oracle's Modern Marketing Experience



We're excited to announce that PossibleNOW will be attending the Oracle Modern Marketing Experience event. Scheduled for March 31 through April 2 at the Venetian in Las Vegas, the event will showcase best practices, training, process innovations, new technologies and networking for marketing professionals.

We know that our enterprise preference management platform is essential for modern marketers and that self-reported customer preferences regarding channels, frequency of communication and topics of interest are essential for creating customer experience strategies. At our booth we'll be able to show off our groundbreaking preference management platform, which seamlessly collects, manages and distributes customer preference data between CRM systems, ESPs, marketing databases, third-party vendors and more.

We're biased but we think we're as exciting as James Franco and One Republic - the keynote and the entertainment.

Will you be there too? To schedule an appointment with PossibleNOW representatives at Modern Marketing Experience, call (800) 585-4888 or email Info@possiblenow.com.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Enrollment vs Engagement: Loyalty In Action


“Are you a member of our loyalty program?” 

Getting to the checkout without hearing that phrase is a modern feat of humankind. Retailers, financial services, and expanding sectors like drugstores and restaurants know that loyalty membership programs are one of the easiest ways to get individual data on shoppers while enhancing the brand-to-consumer relationship. But when shoppers are asked (and asked, and asked again), they often can’t see the forest for the trees—that a loyalty program is an opportunity for consumers themselves to customize a relationship with brands.

The average number of loyalty programs per US household has grown to 29, based on data gathered by Colloquy. That same loyalty data shows that only 42 percent of those memberships are currently active. Just imagine what advantages consumers are missing out on when over half of their memberships are disused. Enrollment doesn’t necessarily mean engagement.

To encourage customers to join the conversation, utilizing a preference management center for users is the best way to improve engagement. Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication, is the ideal way to further involve customers who’ve already opted-in to receive brand news and loyalty benefits.

When customers join your loyalty programs, they’ve already established that they like your brand and want to create an affinity that goes both ways.  They’re waiting for you to start the conversation—have you yet?

Don’t leave yourself vulnerable to inactive customers who relegate your brand to the unused half of their loyalty memberships. Raise the profile of your brand, the affection of your customers and the engagement of your most loyal consumers by giving them the tools to communicate back to you. 




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

The Foundation of Effective Consumer Engagement: Consumer Engagement Begins with Preference Management

Preference Management Video Series

Perpetually connected customers expect support, service and individualized attention from brands, and to do it properly, companies need to execute strategies that combine the efforts of many departments. Often this is easier said than done thanks to antiquated, siloed systems that use fragmented data.

The smartest way to align communications and build a relationship with consumers is by using preference management. Preference management is about building and enhancing customer engagement: letting the customer control the relationship by choosing the desired communication channels, the products or services of interest, and even the frequency of contact.


In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the power of preference management. If you haven’t yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Foundation of Effective Consumer Engagement whitepaper here



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

When Someone’s Preference is Another's Requirement

Remember when it was surprising to learn that someone didn't have a landline phone? The "mobile-only" early adopters were objects of wonder: what if your battery dies? What if you experience a network outage? What if you lose it? Only a decade ago, landlines seemed an essential part of the home. Arranging a room for available electrical outlets and available phone jacks was an ordinary occurrence.


That seems silly now. Roughly half my friends and acquaintances are mobile-only and I must admit that I dust my landline handset more often than I use it. Which brings me to a startling new statistic: a recent study from comScore found that 18 percent of millennials (ages 18 to 34) are mobile-only web users.


In other words, these folks only access the web via mobile devices. Not desktops. And it occurred to me that this is the same phenomenon all over again. Young people don't see desktop computers as luxuries. They see them the same way I looked at my parents' wall-mounted telephone in the kitchen. It was an object of utility, not wonder or awe.



This brings me to my last and most important point. For a mobile-only phone or web user, certain marketing communications preferences aren't really preferences. They are requirements.


When necessary, a company must be able to deliver marketing messages to a mobile device and must do so in responsively designed formats or the mobile-only customer will move on. Not only because they feel ignored but also because of self-imposed limitations on what they access.


A company unable to collect that preference, one that clumsily blasts mobile-only web users with email marketing that can't adjust to screen size, will be every bit as anachronistic as the companies that required a listed home phone to complete a purchase or reservation.


Oftentimes, preference management isn't just about preferences. It's about giving customers the power to direct a company to where it must go in order to be heard at all.





About the Author: 
Rob Tate is the Director of Enterprise Sales at PossibleNOW.






ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

Customers using AT&T’s new gigabit-per-second service, called GigaPower, can receive discounted rates for those that opt-in to sharing some of their trackable data – or pay for privacy, depending on how you look at it.  The $29 difference in plans means that users can choose to receive targeted, relevant ads (and a discounted rate), or stay anonymous at a higher cost. Click here to read more.


A wave of tech-enabled luggage begins hitting showroom floors this season with features including digital locks, built-in scales, GPS- and cellular-enabled tracking, Bluetooth speakers, USB ports, Wi-Fi hotspots, battery chargers and more. Free-standing devices are also entering the market for those looking to enhance existing luggage. Click here to read more.


Internet-connected hardware in large commercial office buildings has the capacity to make a big dent in managing heating, lighting, utility metering and security, say the founders of BuildScience. The Internet-of-Things platform lets building owners and property mangers utilize existing sensors, giving them floor-by-floor stats in order to mange costs and energy usage. Click here to read more.


Apple’s newest product is iconic wearable technology that utilizes many of iPhone’s apps in pared-down versions. Users can summon Siri, receive calls, track fitness goals and get alerts from WeChat, Twitter and Facebook. Click here to read more.



Connected customers at Subway restaurants are logging in and chowing down. The restaurant’s new customer loyalty program encourages guests to connect to the Internet through participating Wi-Fi signals, netting rewards like free sandwiches and more. At subsequent visits, the customers gain more rewards to reflect their loyalty level. Click here to read more. 




Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

When Transparency Nets a Win



It's fair to say that today's modern consumers are aware that a bit of information goes a long way. By sharing simple preferences with companies, a customer's experiences can be vastly improved with recommendations, preferred communications and ideal contact methods. That means not only one-off experiences (an in-store errand, a single online shopping bag, a customer service call), but entire lifetime relationships can be enhanced and personalized.

A Janrain survey found that 57 percent of consumers are happy to provide preference information in acknowledgment that their personalized experience will be superior to an anonymous one. But the catch is in casting a wider net: targeting those customers who avoid sharing preferences because they don't understand what happens next.

That same study found that if a business explained how it was using personal information to improve consumers' online experiences, then 77 percent of customers would trust the company more. From 57 percent to 77 percent and all you have to do is remind the customer that you have both the functionality and responsibility to protect their information.

When otherwise engaged or loyal consumers stop short of sharing their unique consumer characteristics, they lose out. Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication, is the framework for creating customer experiences that build loyal, lasting relationships. And like any relationship, it starts with trust.

If, when you're asking for preferences from your customers, you aren't also reminding them how you're using and protecting their information, then you're not getting the big win. Make sure you're reaching not only the quick-to-share customers but the ones who need that additional clarification.




Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

The Foundation of Effective Consumer Engagement: Virtualization of the Consumer Relationship

Preference Management Video Series

The rise of the Internet and the proliferation of connected devices has meant that we've never had more ways to converse with brands. Connectedness supersedes geography and availability, and consumers can demand personalized experiences devoid of interruption advertising.

How has this transition affected marketing? We are now tasked with ensuring privacy, remembering preferences, and proactively engaging consumers. We're connected, conversing and building strong relationships regardless of how virtual they may be.



In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the power of preference management. If you haven't yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Foundation of Effective Consumer Engagement whitepaper here




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

Transition to Retention from Acquisition

Ever find yourself entering a room in your house and as soon as you cross the threshold, you think, "Why did I walk in here?" Happens to all of us. Some distraction along the way made us think of something else, our priorities changed and suddenly our purpose-filled journey fizzled. Why did we come to the kitchen? No idea.

On a personal level, it's no big deal. It's silly, really. But consider the same thing on a macro marketing level, and it’s a huge problem. Many companies are good at customer acquisition - inviting consumers into the room - but watch thousands of them walk out again, victims to the yawning chasm between initial sale and full engagement. They know how to sell, and they know how to service a recurring customer, but they have no idea how to help someone whose priorities or preferences may have changed after first contact.

Without an interaction element, companies of all sizes fall victim to the proverbial Bermuda Triangle of modern marketing. The solution lies in continued interaction with prospects by understanding their true preferences through preference management, actively collecting, maintaining and distributing unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, channel preference and frequency of communication across a company's systems.

According to a survey from Forrester Research, 77 percent of consumers say companies should let them decide how they can contact them. Meanwhile, an Infosys global consumer study found that 72 percent feel that online promotions or emails they receive don’t speak to their personal needs or interests. In other words, consumers want to share ownership of the conversation and they want it to be relevant.

Implementation of a robust preference center, or central location for preference selection, is an important first step. Expanding preference collection to multiple touchpoints, such as mobile, social media, in-store, contact center and more, is critical. Finally, deployment of iterative preference interactions at various points in the prospect journey allow for progressive corrections and greater overall accumulation of actionable data. These actions maintain meaningful contact between company and prospect and allow for course-correction prior to disengagement or opt-out.

Forgetting why you went to the kitchen isn't a crisis - whatever you wanted will still be there later when you remember it. The same cannot be said for a consumer that loses touch with their original interest in a product or service. The company offering that product or service must interact with that consumer to listen, learn and adjust. Otherwise, the consumer will fall into the gap between acquisition and retention, never to be heard from again.






About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores last summer. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.



Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

New Facebook reporting tool aims to improve ad relevance

Advertisements on Facebook are being scrutinized - are you hot or not? Relevance scores will be on a scale of 1 to 10 and will be based on interaction and feedback on the ad. Higher scores means ads will be more visible because they're connecting to the right people, while ads with lagging scores can be tweaked during a campaign to improve performance. Click here to read more.


Mary Twinem of Buffalo Wild Wings: Customer service, technology draw 20-somethings

The popular restaurant has shown consistent growth for investors but two of their newest initiatives are particularly related to customer experience, not bottom lines. They believe that hiring guest experience captains (neither a host nor waitstaff) and utilizing technology at tables for guests to use during their visit will personalize visits and enhance long-term loyalty. Click here to read more.

Samsung Tweaks Television Policy Over Privacy Concerns

Responding to consumer worries about Samsung's smart TVs overhearing (and potentially logging) owners' private conversations in their homes, the company clarified that viewers must permit the devices to listen. Voice recognition capabilities meant that the TVs could eavesdrop to better learn verbal commands. Click here to read more.


Neiman Marcus Takes Customer Experience to Next Level with "Memory Mirror"

A new offering slowly unrolling in Neiman Marcus stores is a Memory Mirror, a giant video screen and camera that allows shoppers to try on, model, and then view their clothing from 360 degrees. The mirror's video file is security protected by password but can also be emailed to shoppers (and their friends if they want a second opinion). Click here to read more.


Report: Automakers Fail To Protect Connected Cars From Security, Privacy Hacks

Today new car models today come fully loaded with technology that makes personalized assistance possible - navigation, entertainment and roadside assistance, most commonly. Yet a recent report indicates that automakers lack security safeguards for that technology that could prevent hacks and theft. Click here to read more.







Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

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