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GDPR 101: How GDPR Impacts Marketing

An educational series on the EU's soon-to- be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Most marketers think about customer data in terms of its potential use. Personal data fuels campaigns, tailors landing pages and drives bottom line results. How can they be effective under GDPR?

To begin, they need to think about the basis of their efforts. Does it begin with consent tied to specific use? Or was this data obtained by other means?

Secondly, do you have the capability to prove that consent, answer consumer questions about it and, if necessary, completely erase a contact if a consumer requests to be forgotten?

These factors undoubtedly lessen marketers' freedom to use data for outreach. But it doesn't completely bar them from sound, effective interaction and loyalty cultivation so long as they are supplied with the technology and data governance needed to succeed in a GDPR world.



For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

GDPR 101: Clear and Conspicuous Consent

An educational series on the EU's soon-to-be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Under GDPR, companies must earn unambiguous consent in order to communicate with an EU consumer or collect data from them. However, this consent cannot be hidden in the terms and conditions language or tied to a condition of service.

Instead, consent must be clear and conspicuous. So what does that mean?

On a web page, consent language should be prominently featured immediately above or below the "submit" button where a user would request or volunteer information.

For some marketers, this will mean a fundamental reconsideration of page design and conversion opportunities. It will likely lead to a new design approval processes as companies pivot to GDPR risk mitigation strategies. Regardless, it demands that anyone collecting info from EU consumers consider the definition of "unambiguous" and re-orient sales, marketing, support and billing communications accordingly.



For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

GDPR 101: Controllers and Processors

An educational series on the EU's soon-to-be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Understanding your company's GDPR risk exposure is essential. To this, it is often helpful to identify how regulators would categorize your company.

In other words, are you a controller or a processor?

A "controller" is the party that ultimately owns the relationship with the consumer and determines what happens with their data. A "processor" is the party contracted by the controller to execute its decisions with regard to consumer data.

For example, imagine an insurance company that represents EU citizens. It collects information from its customers and emails them from time to time. To do this, the insurance company uses an Email Service Provider (ESP). The insurance company is the controller and the ESP is the processor.

Under GDPR, most of the regulatory onus is on the controller. But there are some obligations that processors must meet as well.

In many cases, controllers are liable for the actions of their processors. Companies must ensure compliance across all vendor relationships that manage data in and out of EU sources.

In turn, processors can get their clients (and themselves) into very hot water with GDPR violations. They must understand their responsibilities and in fact can gain a competitive advantage by demonstrating their GDPR preparedness as full implementation of the rule approaches.



For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

GDPR 101: Specific Use Requirement

An educational series on the EU's soon-to-be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

GDPR will govern more than just permission to communicate with EU consumers. It will also influence how companies use data collected from EU citizens and limit their ability to use personal data for multi-channel marketing.

Simply put, GDPR requires companies to clearly identify the "specific use" a piece of information will serve. While the exact definitions around specific use are still gray, experts recommend that companies select and declare specific uses for any and all data collection.

For example, student loan provider might request an email address specifically for loan payment reminders. A financial services company might seek a birth date in order to make an investor aware of change-of-life effects to insurance or other financial products.

Regardless, GDPR prohibits the collection of personal data for one purpose (loan payment reminders) and its use in other purposes (email marketing).



Specific use definitions will likely be clarified in court as early challenges and violations come to light. In the meantime, consider your intended uses and declare them clearly at the point of collection.

For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

GDPR 101: Right to Know?

An educational series on the EU's soon-to- be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

GDPR doesn't just limit the rights of companies. It empowers consumers to hold greater leverage against the companies that collect and use their personal data.

Once implemented in May 2018, GDPR will enable EU citizens to request explanations from companies about the personal data they have, the uses they intend for it, how long they plan to keep it and more.

Experts suggest that companies will likely face 30-day deadlines to comply with such requests and if they want to file an extension, they should be prepared to demonstrate very convincing reasons for needing more time.

What's unclear is how consumers will react to this newfound power. Will they bombard companies with requests, questions and objections? Or largely ignore their right to know out of indifference or trust in the companies that serve them?



Regardless, any company communicating with EU citizens must be prepared to answer right to know requests accurately and in a timely fashion.

For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

GDPR 101: Right to be Forgotten

An educational series on the EU's soon-to-be-implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Over the course of this series, we've written quite a bit about the rules that govern company-consumer relationships under GDPR. But what happens when a consumer wants to end their relationship with a company?

Moving forward, EU citizens will hold the "right to be forgotten." In certain circumstances, consumers will be able to request that companies destroy all records related to them. Having done so, the burden of proof will lie on the company in any instances where records must be stored or maintained to comply with other, superseding regulation.

Even in instances where all data can be destroyed without repercussion, doing so is much easier said than done. Companies with siloed data storage systems, whether by division, language, geography or something else, will have to track down everything related to that customer and prove that it has been erased.



EU citizens right to be forgotten underscores the urgent need for centralization of customer data inside companies along with accurate causation, transition and changed state records to track down every last trace.

For more informative videos about GDPR, click here, or to view a full webinar on GDPR and consent capture best practices, click here.




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

Does Your Brand Experience Align with Customers’ Voices? Elizabeth Arden Shows How

"Our leaders quickly realized that before we could use digital to transform our customers and the world, we needed to transform ourselves." This according to General Electric Co. CMO, Linda Boff, "Over the last few years the company changed its way of doing business at every level." And, per Boff, "When we apply these technologies in our teams and facilities, our customers and markets can reach their potential."

"Listening" has been the industry buzz word for years and is key to building relationships for both BtoB and BtoC businesses. And although many companies have put in place extensive systems for "listening" very few are responding to what they are "hearing."

So, the action companies must take is to share customer listening insights across all departments involved in product development and marketing. They must ensure that the actual brand experience and products align with BtoB and BtoC customer's voices.

Elizabeth Arden Goes Inside to Get Insights
Going beyond traditional focus groups has been a strategy for beauty company, Elizabeth Arden who looks to their "Arden Insiders," insight community of more than 4,000 women, to inform the direction of innovation and critical product and design decisions. Utilizing consumer opinions and feedback, the company can make educated decisions to stay aligned with consumer sentiment.

Celia Tombalakian, the senior director of global insights and product development commented on their new customer-insight driven marketing, "…[The] Customer intelligence platform allows us not only to identify our customer's likes and dislikes…but to stay current on who she is and where she is going from a beauty point of view—typical focus groups or questionnaires just can't capture this."

The company uses this insight group to test copy, print ad concepts, promotional offerings, product claims, model photography, and branding and new product ideas. The feedback drives decisions on all aspects of creative and design. Per Tombalakian, "We launched our community as a one-year pilot and within the six months we were discussing plans for geographic expansion. The ROI was very apparent to all stakeholders."

The company uses real time feedback on initiatives they are working on through their Arden Insiders insight community customer intelligence platform. Noted Tombalakian, "Arden Insiders transformed how we are making many decisions…this is critical because they can weave [the customer] point of view through all stages of product or program development rather than just key junctions."

The company also implemented a dedicated market research and customer insight department to assure that their customers' voice is incorporated in all decisions. Tombalakian summed up the investment payoff, "We launched our community as a one-year pilot and within the six months we were discussing …expansion. The ROI was very apparent to all stakeholders."

Use Insights to Connect
Findings from 15,000+ hours of VoC research interviews indicate that customers want deeper engagement throughout their brand lifecycle. This means that marketers should utilize Voice of Customer (VoC) insights from your customers and prospects to improve their experience during all these key points: acquisition, activation, loyalty—and critically, deepening the relationship.

Here are a few quotes from recent VoC research to consider as you develop your strategies:
"When a supplier proactively works to understand my needs, we can develop a personal connection. That forms the basis of a long-term relationship that will remain when we are approached by their competitors or have the occasional problem with their solution."

"I appreciate you asking for feedback and clearly listening and taking action based on what we are saying. Very few companies ask for our opinions regarding how they can get better and what I would like to see them do. That’s cool. It means you are trying to get bigger and better."

It's not just BtoC companies that are seeing results from customer listening, BtoB brands such as GE have devised campaigns to target niche audiences to gain insights on sentiment. GE's #CC9900 GEEKS GO campaign connected with coders in a challenge environment on social media that used a game-style conversation to spark interactions.

Make Listening an Everyday Marketing Practice
In a research report by Wharton, Listening to the Online 'Voice of the Customer', the following points were cited:
  • Large online customer discussions boards carry the potential to revolutionize the world of market research, offering businesses a massive and free data base of what customers think about their products.
  • Traditional surveys and focus groups are flawed because the process of identifying the specific product attributes in a customer survey [are] typically guided by company marketing managers, [and] often ignore issues being raised by customers. In addition, focus groups might not always reach the most passionate and engaged customers who are voluntarily discussing products and brands on the Internet.
  • [There are] "unseen attributes of a product" – that is, issues that buyers are discussing which executives back at the headquarters are not even aware of.

The takeaway for brands is that actual customer sentiment needs to be a prime focus and that listening (rather than assuming or modeling) must become a regular part of everyday marketing practices.



About the Author:
Ernan Roman Direct Marketing's Customer Experience strategies achieve consistent double-digit increases in response and revenue for their clients, which include IBM, MassMutual, QVC, Microsoft, and Symantec Corp.

As a leader in providing Voice of Customer research-based guidance, ERDM has conducted over 10,000 hours of interviews with their clients' customers and prospects, to gain an in-depth understanding of their expectations for high-value relationships.

The results achieved by ERDM's VoC-based strategies earned Ernan Roman induction into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

Visit his blog at: http://ernanroman.blogspot.com/

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