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Monday, September 26, 2016

The Technology to Solve Compliance Needs

With Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) class action lawsuits on the rise, compliance is more important now than ever before. In 2007, just 14 suits were filed nationwide. Last year that number jumped to more than 3,700. Because of broad interpretations of the statute by the Federal Communications Commission, lawsuits have found legal traction paired with uncapped statutory damages ranging from $500-1000 per violation.

Originally passed into law in 1991 in an effort to reduce unwanted telephone calls, TCPA has been amended over the years to include governance of SMS text messages, prerecorded voice messages and the use of automated dialing systems. That's why we recommend technology solutions and data verification services to help companies comply with privacy regulations – thereby avoiding the rising tide of class action lawsuits. 

"Any company that calls or texts consumers must understand the requirements of TCPA and use the right technology to process their campaign lists and verify permission," says Ron Patrick, Director of Product Architecture at PossibleNOW. 

It should also be noted that TCPA lawsuits are not limited to account recovery or outbound marketing companies. Lawsuits have been filed across many industries, including against sports franchises, social networking companies, retailers, pharmacies, travel and entertainment companies and online service providers.

PossibleNOW's MyPreferences collects and manages consent while DNCSolution scrubs and verifies contacts, empowering companies to engage in marketing, sales, support, account recovery and more. No matter your industry, there is a solution that fits your business and keeps you compliant. 



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Thursday, September 22, 2016

ICYMI: Preferences, Privacy and Personalization in the News

Google launches travel app that lets you personalize your whole trip

Google Tips combines the strengths of other travel-related apps, like Yelp and TripAdvisor, by aiming to make your whole trip seamless once you've arrived. Using maps, calendars and other users’ data, the app synchronizes your plans and other information to suggest day trips or schedule visits to restaurants and attractions. Click here to read more. 


Everything you need to know about wireless emergency alerts (WEAs)

Residents of New York City received emergency text notifications on their smartphones the Monday after weekend Chelsea bombing. The wireless emergency alert (WEA) system is rarely used, but is more far-reaching and effective compared to TV-based emergency broadcast system. Most often used for severe weather or Amber alerts, government agencies must decide which situations call for an alert. Click here to read more. 


U.S. Signals Backing for Self-Driving Cars

Federal regulators gave a first signal to the auto industry that they're anticipating more automated vehicles on the road – and are prepared for the change in transportation options. Automated cars are being seen as safer in general, and less prone to human error, but regulators must balance commercial interests with remaining concerns over public safety. Click here to read more. 


Stripe Now Lets Any Business Instantly Pay Its Workers 

A San Francisco startup is capitalizing on the gig economy of services like Uber or Postmates by streamlining payments to workers. The technology is part of a larger trend of the way finances are frequently transferred between people and businesses. Cashing out payments immediately hasn't always been possible through e-commerce services in online marketplaces, but Stripe is about to move into the market. Click here to read more. 


New Sacramento Kings app will guide NBA fans to their seat and show length of restroom lines

A new app for the NBA team will use software from Cartogram to direct fans to their seats with turn-by-turn directions from the parking lot, through the plaza and to their seats. The same technology can also provide real-time information on lines for restrooms or concessions. Using Google's mapping technology, Cartogram can use beacon technology to pinpoint more precise and personalized directions within large locations like malls, expos or resorts. Click here to read more. 






Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Preference Data ROI: Customer Relationship Management

Preference Management Video Series

When you're building better experiences and engagement opportunities for your customers, it's tempting to get wrapped up in every possible metric in the hopes that drilling down in the data unlocks a perfect solution. But the truth is that the marketing technology landscape has expanded exponentially over the years – meaning that the more technology you use, the less sure you can be that your enterprise-wide view of the customer is accurate.

TERM, which stands for Technology Enabled Relationship Management, is the concept of forming an enterprise-wide view of your customers across all contact channels. And the technology to do so has expanded rapidly. In August 2011 a marketing technology blogger quantified the companies in this industry – tallying around 100 at the time. In 2014 he counted again and reached 950 companies. When he released his 2016 numbers, he’d found that there were over 3,800 companies doing this work.

So it's a trend that's not going anywhere, but how do you make sure you're doing it well? The problem is that of those 3,800 companies, they all offer some insights about your customer, but can never provide the whole picture. Using a number of individual systems doesn't necessarily guarantee that the systems share their information across the enterprise, causing different one-dimensional views of the customer and blurring opportunities for two-way conversation.

In this short video, Eric Holtzclaw describes the growth of the marketing landscape and the faults of too much marketing technology when not integrated properly. Learn more about trends toward opt-in marketing in our Preference Data ROI whitepaper.




In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the power of preference data. If you haven't yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Preference Data ROI whitepaper here.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Monday, September 19, 2016

The Pressure to Present Results

ROI, KPI, quarterly reports, annual plans. Tired of it all? I hear you. Quantifying results for marketing initiatives is a tall order, because traditionally pinpointing marketing results is much more challenging than showing off results elsewhere in the company, like sales or IT departments. 

When Leapfrog Marketing Institute's CMO Benchmark Survey showed that 93% of CMOs were under pressure to deliver measurable return on investment, I wasn't necessarily surprised. I was sympathetic though.



The pressure of proving ROI is one thing, but what complicates matters is the fact that so few companies even have the ability or data to deliver those results. If you're expected to show return on investment but you're faced with internal silos, a lack of technological solutions and impatient executives, you're left with little to build on.



No matter the industry, preference management not only paves the way for a modern omnichannel approach, but it also forces silos to break down and provides quantifiable data. Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication is an initiative that can be rolled out slowly, allowing early stages to prove the ROI before expanding to additional touchpoints. 

And at every stage, data points can prove successes. Because preference management is built from consumer opt-ins, the initial data is already positive – indicating which customers are ready to start a conversation with your brand. Moreover, additional data will continue to enhance the relationship by establishing preferences stated by the consumer himself.



So sure, proving marketing ROI is difficult when you have few tools, but so is breaking down silos and impressing both executives and customers. So don't hide from showing ROI and KPIs and following through on reports, with preference management, a steady path will appear before you. 




About the Author: 
Eric V. Holtzclaw is  Chief Strategist  of PossibleNOW. He's a researcher, writer, serial entrepreneur and challenger-of-conventional wisdom. His book with Wiley Publishing on consumer behavior - Laddering: Unlocking the Potential of Consumer Behavior - hit bookstores in the summer of 2013. Eric helps strategically guide companies with the implementation of enterprise-wide preference management solutions.


Follow me on Twitter: @eholtzclaw | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Holtzclaw

Friday, September 16, 2016

"Sorry, We’ll Fix It" Seem To Be The Hardest Words

In speaking about the Volkswagen emissions scandal, Johns Hopkins Professor Sylvia Long-Tolbert noted, "I don't think people will be able to understand… a company that has misled consumers and been dishonest… people aren't going to feel very confident in buying that [brand]… People want companies to acknowledge that a problem exists."

Brand problems will always happen. But it's how brands respond that will make or break consumer trust. According to an Ohio State University study on the power of apology, it was noted that the most important thing you can do is admit responsibility, "Say it is your fault, that you made a mistake." A concern about apologies is that talk is cheap. It's different if you say 'I'll fix what is wrong.'

And while Mattias Mueller, the chief executive of Volkswagen did have a "2 minute conversation" with President Obama to "personally apologize to him for our behavior," the company has not extended that same courtesy to the U.S. public. Instead, in his prepared apology remarks to the U.S. public Mueller was somewhat defensive regarding the problem stating, "it was an ethical problem? I cannot understand why you say that… We didn’t lie."

As expected, Volkswagen's lack of ownership of its emission problems has had a dramatic effect on sales, with March the 16th month with a drop in sales over the last past 18 months.

In contrast, IKEA, which has had problems recently with dressers that tip over, has taken the issue head on. In one of the largest U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recalls involving over 29 Million IKEA products the company is now attempting to lead the charge in consumer safety.

U.S. IKEA President, Lars Petersson took to the airwaves to alert consumers about the issues, "You may have heard about the recall of IKEA MALM and other chests of drawers models… At IKEA, we want to help create a better life for our customers. Part of that is helping our customers create a safe home for their families." The company has created a campaign called, "Secure It" to educate consumers about tip over accidents.

And while this is not exactly an apology, IKEA is acknowledging the issue and offering help to consumers. It has received the backing of The American Academy of Pediatrics, Consumers Union, Consumer Federation of America, Kids In Danger, The National Center for Health Research, Public Citizen and Shane's Foundation.

TakeAways on Brand Problem Resolution:
  1. Findings from our VoC Research indicate that consumers want immediate and honest resolution to negative experiences. Brands need to own the problem and define actions to correct the error.
  2. Additionally, our VoC research indicates that there needs to be a change in company culture and thinking; from "how does this benefit us?" to "how does this benefit the customer?" If brands portray themselves as defensive or dishonest on hot-button issues, consumers will develop distrust towards the brand.
  3. In the report, How to Save Brand after Crises? it was noted, "After a brand crisis, how the firm responds eventually determines the extent to which the brand can be saved… consumers have the right to determine whether to forgive the brand or not… individuals … are more likely to trust the transgressor following an apology." But the study goes on to state that consumers can get even angrier when, "[the company does not] acknowledge its responsibility in the apology letter."

Brand crises have enormous immediate and far-reaching implications. Rapid acknowledgement and a sincere, human apology are the determining factors as to whether consumers will ultimately forgive, and continue the brand relationship, or not.



About the Author:
Ernan Roman Direct Marketing's Customer Experience strategies achieve consistent double-digit increases in response and revenue for their clients, which include IBM, MassMutual, QVC, Microsoft, and Symantec Corp.

As a leader in providing Voice of Customer research-based guidance, ERDM has conducted over 10,000 hours of interviews with their clients' customers and prospects, to gain an in-depth understanding of their expectations for high-value relationships.

The results achieved by ERDM's VoC-based strategies earned Ernan Roman induction into the Marketing Hall of Fame.

Visit his blog at: http://ernanroman.blogspot.com/

Monday, September 12, 2016

Preferences Have to Be Personal

I recently downloaded an app on my phone that asked for a number of permissions. In my work I know that developers have to be cautious in identifying how an app either could or would interact with your phone, and therefore privacy. For the most part, apps request permissions for intuitive things: your phone's camera for image-sharing programs, your location for geographic searches or tagging, your name or address data for auto-fills on sign-up forms.

But because I've become so used to permissions and privacy talk, I have to admit that on occasion I don't always drill down to investigate each and every iteration of permission-giving and the actions behind it. Can you guess where this is going? 

What I didn't realize when I downloaded this app was that when I created an account with the company online, it replicated my account on the smartphone app—however, I was given entirely new preferences for mobile usage. 

While saving my searches across platforms is one thing, automatically assuming that because I'm on a smartphone I'd like to be updated at all times in every possible way about my search results is quite another. Soon I was receiving notifications more than daily—based on my GPS location or updates to the items I'd saved. 

The problem here stems from the fact that the program was trying to be too smart: It recognized that I was on a mobile phone – therefore I was easy to reach and perhaps open to GPS notifications of when I was near a shopping opportunity. But in over-anticipating my needs and never stopping to ask when or how I wanted to know relevant information, it failed to be intelligent about my wants. 

Preference management, the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication, is essential in cross-platform permissions. While it's enticing to automatically sign customers up for every option under the sun, it ultimately creates a backlog of unwanted notifications that leave a bitter taste in consumers' mouths. 

What did I do? After a few days of swiping away screens full of notifications, I opened the app and went straight to the program's settings. What I'd been given was intrusive and ineffective, but re-setting my preferences allowed me to personalize the app for the engagement and intelligence I was originally expecting. I unchecked nearly every box, all of which had been automatically chosen for me. Problem solved – thankfully. 


Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Preference Data ROI: Customer Relationships Must Be Compliant

Preference Management Video Series

While the first video in this series was on the important topic of two-way dialogue with customers, it's essential that your company's method of communication respect not only their preferences, but their privacy. When sharing, listening and responding to customers, all the good intentions in the world can't save you from expensive legal entanglements.

At the end of the day, it's simple: Customer relationships must be compliant. When companies overreach in their relationship, the government can step in to protect the consumer.

What form do those protections take? The primary law that marketers must observe is the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), which limits unsolicited prerecorded telemarking calls to landlines and autodialed or prerecorded calls to wireless numbers. On email, marketers must observe guidelines in the CAN-SPAM Act, a law that governs commercial messaging, like emails.

The shift toward permission-based marketing is broad and irreversible, but it also brings hefty fines. While our ultimate goal is engaged consumers that are empowered in their brand relationships, those same consumers can be swiftly turned off by irresponsible companies acting illegally. And the companies violating regulations risk multi-millions of dollars in fines.

In this short video, Matt Cagle describes the ways that your brand can and should communicate with customers to ensure that you’re in compliance. Learn more about positive trends toward opt-in marketing in our Preference Data ROI whitepaper.




In the following weeks, we'll continue to roll out videos to guide you through the power of preference data. If you haven't yet explored our Resource Center, you can download the Preference Data ROI whitepaper here.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

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